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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi so I've started having abs issues (both rear reluctor rings and speed sensors need replacing) and im just wondering if anybodys diyd this repair how hard it is? Never really done anything like this but just been quoted 1k+ from a BMW garage🤦‍♂️
Also would it be easier to just replace both drive shafts instead? I have no idea any help is appreciated thanks
 

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I recently replaced a wheel bearing and thought I would do the ring at the same time.
Mine was causing no problems but I could see a small area was catching the sensor, the ring had expanded a little. It's not major job, could be done in 5-6 hours for both sides if all things release easily but I would set a day aside to do it right. I cleaned the shafts fully, ground off any rust with a Dremel which left a nice smooth flat surface for the ring to mate with. I sprayed them before fitting the rings,
A garage will not spend as long as I did on prep work, they will just want to get the rings fitted. Roughly, if all goes well, it might be about 2 hours to get the shafts out and you could fit the rings in around an hour with very basic prep. Then another hour or so to refit.
That's knowing what to do, for someone who has never done anything like it, that time will be longer. You will need to drop the exhaust a little near side to slide the shaft out. Unhook it from the rubbers and support it

It would be quicker to replace the shafts because it's the same job but there is no time spent on cleaning and preparing the shaft for the new ring. Also, if the rings have got into such a state, there could be so much rust to remove from the shaft that by the time it's clean and ready, the circumference is too small to keep the ring in place.

One of the more difficult parts can be getting the hub nut off, one if mine was heavily seized and rather than spend ages with bars etc, I simply cut it off. Then there are six E12 bolts to undo on the diff, once undone, you can pull the shaft out. It is recommended these are replaced, they are not large and are torqued to 57nm. Removing the shaft could possibly take extra time since it may be stuck firmly in the hub. That's not in every case, mine tapped out easily. However, it's another reason a new shaft may be handy since you could damage the old one removing it.

It's all a bit an unknown until you see what you get off the car. If I was taking the car in for the job, I would have new shafts for sure, less time involved and if they just do the rings, unless they prep correctly, you could find the rust forms quickly and expands the ring. In the end, I did both sides, rings and bearings although the n/s ring looked fine, still had it's black protective coating but it flaked off quite easily. In the picture below, the one on the right is the offside ring, you can see it had started to expand on the inner edge which faces the diff. I decided not to replace the shafts because my car is not high mileage and I felt the OEM would be better than some unknown brand or should I say known brand but made by who? It could be better to get Shaftec refurbs than a cheap set if not OEM.

You don't need a lot of tools for this job but it's handy to have a good few alternatives, various extension bars etc. An E12 spanner is useful for the bolts, a socket fits but it's a bit tight by the side of the below but that's just a slight timesaver. To do it correctly you will need a socket and a torque wrench but some people just guess the tightness.

If you want to know anything, just ask, if I can help, I will.




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Here is a finished one ready to fit. I was able to use my old ring to seat the new one but gentle taps equally round with a light hammer does it once on the shaft.
As well as paint, the ring is glued on which also protects from rust and then had a layer of BH UC applied before and also after fitting for maximum protection.
I don't want to do it again 😂
Automotive tire Light Tread Automotive wheel system Rim
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I recently replaced a wheel bearing and thought I would do the ring at the same time.
Mine was causing no problems but I could see a small area was catching the sensor, the ring had expanded a little. It's not major job, could be done in 5-6 hours for both sides if all things release easily but I would set a day aside to do it right. I cleaned the shafts fully, ground off any rust with a Dremel which left a nice smooth flat surface for the ring to mate with. I sprayed them before fitting the rings,
A garage will not spend as long as I did on prep work, they will just want to get the rings fitted. Roughly, if all goes well, it might be about 2 hours to get the shafts out and you could fit the rings in around an hour with very basic prep. Then another hour or so to refit.
That's knowing what to do, for someone who has never done anything like it, that time will be longer. You will need to drop the exhaust a little near side to slide the shaft out. Unhook it from the rubbers and support it

It would be quicker to replace the shafts because it's the same job but there is no time spent on cleaning and preparing the shaft for the new ring. Also, if the rings have got into such a state, there could be so much rust to remove from the shaft that by the time it's clean and ready, the circumference is too small to keep the ring in place.

One of the more difficult parts can be getting the hub nut off, one if mine was heavily seized and rather than spend ages with bars etc, I simply cut it off. Then there are six E12 bolts to undo on the diff, once undone, you can pull the shaft out. It is recommended these are replaced, they are not large and are torqued to 57nm. Removing the shaft could possibly take extra time since it may be stuck firmly in the hub. That's not in every case, mine tapped out easily. However, it's another reason a new shaft may be handy since you could damage the old one removing it.

It's all a bit an unknown until you see what you get off the car. If I was taking the car in for the job, I would have new shafts for sure, less time involved and if they just do the rings, unless they prep correctly, you could find the rust forms quickly and expands the ring. In the end, I did both sides, rings and bearings although the n/s ring looked fine, still had it's black protective coating but it flaked off quite easily. In the picture below, the one on the right is the offside ring, you can see it had started to expand on the inner edge which faces the diff. I decided not to replace the shafts because my car is not high mileage and I felt the OEM would be better than some unknown brand or should I say known brand but made by who? It could be better to get Shaftec refurbs than a cheap set if not OEM.

You don't need a lot of tools for this job but it's handy to have a good few alternatives, various extension bars etc. An E12 spanner is useful for the bolts, a socket fits but it's a bit tight by the side of the below but that's just a slight timesaver. To do it correctly you will need a socket and a torque wrench but some people just guess the tightness.

If you want to know anything, just ask, if I can help, I will.




View attachment 18207

Here is a finished one ready to fit. I was able to use my old ring to seat the new one but gentle taps equally round with a light hammer does it once on the shaft.
As well as paint, the ring is glued on which also protects from rust and then had a layer of BH UC applied before and also after fitting for maximum protection.
I don't want to do it again 😂
View attachment 18209
Wow thanks so much for such a detailed response, I'm going to be giving myself 2 days off work to try this soon because I'm such a noob I don't think 1 day will be enough😂 this will definitely help me out a lot dude.
 

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Wow thanks so much for such a detailed response, I'm going to be giving myself 2 days off work to try this soon because I'm such a noob I don't think 1 day will be enough😂 this will definitely help me out a lot dude.
Two days would be ideal, gives you time work on things methodically. You will need two new nuts for the shafts and an appropriate 12 point socket. You can get a deep one but the further out it is, the more chance there is of it twisting off as you undo the nut at the 90 degree angle. You can support it at that point with something as you apply pressure. It may be worth removing the wheel caps before doing the job, keep applying Plusgas etc. each day. I don't think it really does a lot though but you never know. You will see a small lip on the nut which has indentations. They need bending back out or just breaking off to undo the nut. When I did my second side, I used a small chisel to remove that lip by simply tapping outwards all the way round and effectively cutting it away so it looks like this.
Light Gas Auto part Electric blue Natural material


You then have more chance to get Plusgas onto the threads as the seal is broke. You can see the lip on the picture below, you tap it into the recess to secure the nut on refit. My thread was M24 with a 30mm nut, tightened to 145Nm with an angle of rotation 45 degrees. But, from what I have seen, many just do it up tight 😂


Automotive tire Motor vehicle Rim Wood Automotive wheel system
 
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